Ute's Pics

From the darkness of war to the bright lights of Hollywood in the 20s, explore Head of Sales Ute Krebs' top images and clips in the archive 

1. What is your role at Bridgeman?
 
As the Head of Sales of the Berlin team, I oversee and support the activities of all German account managers. My tasks vary each day but mainly include keeping track of ongoing projects, working closely with the marketing team in the UK, identifying new areas of sales and meeting up with clients. 
 
 
2. What do you love most about the job?
 
What I love most about my job is that each day at the office is different as my tasks are so versatile and diverse. I love the research aspect of it, especially looking into our amazing footage archive, as well as the personal side: establishing a close relationship with clients who work in a number of different industries and helping them with whatever they need.
 
It never ceases to astonish me to see how our clients end up using our images – from wallpapers to art installations or product packaging and it makes me proud to be part of their projects. 
 
 
3. What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?
 
Those who don't know Bridgeman think that we offer fine art images only. Our content is really much more than that though! People are often surprised to hear that we do have a huge footage collection with many clips exclusive to us, as well as stunning photographic content, patterns, historic images and much more. 
 
I only started working for Bridgeman at the beginning of 2015 and am happy to say that I still discover new and impressive images each day. Especially when it comes to our contemporary Bridgeman Studio artists. We represent lots of young and upcoming artists and it’s a joy to see and license their work ranging from photography to illustrations.
 

 

Ute Krebs, Head of Sales in Berlin
Ute Krebs, Head of Sales in Berlin

 

 

Caroline on the Stairs, Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images
Caroline on the Stairs, Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

 

1. Caspar David Friedrich

Caspar David Friedrich was the reason why I decided to study art history - our art teacher at school was a big fan and his romantic and often dark paintings, drawings and engravings very much appealed to my teenage self. This is a painting I hadn't seen much before and its quiet domesticity very much appeals to me.

 

 

 

2. Botticelli

There is no question in my mind that this is my favourite painting of all time. As an art history undergraduate in London I had to give a presentation on this in the National Gallery and so I spent a long time staring at this young man in preparation.

Botticelli is one of my favourite painters and I will never get sick of this portrait which I go to see every time I am in London. Read more about my love for Botticelli...

 

Portrait of a Young Man, c.1480-85 (tempera & oil on panel), Sandro Botticelli (Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi) / National Gallery, London, UK / Bridgeman Images
Portrait of a Young Man, c.1480-85 (tempera & oil on panel), Sandro Botticelli (Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi) / National Gallery, London, UK / Bridgeman Images

 

 

The First Searchlights at Charing Cross, 1914, Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) / Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery) U.K. / Bridgeman Images
The First Searchlights at Charing Cross, 1914, Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) / Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery) U.K. / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

3. Paintings of War

World War I was a big turning point in 20th century art and changed the way many contemporary artists viewed the world. This painting by Nevinson epitomizes the horrors of the war to me without showing the trenches and bloodied soldiers.

The darkness, starkness and sharp angles are uncomfortable. Zeppelins were used to attack civilians from the air and so these searchlights also symbolize the fear and unknowing of the war.

 

 

4. Russian Art

I have a soft spot for Russian Art from the 1920s, especially the collages by Alexander Rodchenko. There is something very positive and bold about this poster for a bookshop that I love. It also reminds me of an album cover by Franz Ferdinand who are one of my favourite bands but that is just by the by!

 

 

Poster for Leningrad State Publishers, 1925, Alexander Rodchenko (1891-1956) / Private Collection / Calmann & King Ltd / Bridgeman Images
Poster for Leningrad State Publishers, 1925, Alexander Rodchenko (1891-1956) / Private Collection / Calmann & King Ltd / Bridgeman Images

 

 

The Death of Marat / The Pen is Mightier than the Sword / Ikono.tv / Bridgeman Images
The Death of Marat / The Pen is Mightier than the Sword / Ikono.tv / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

5. Jacques Louis David

I feel like a kid in a candy store looking through all the amazing footage we have in the archive and this one is one of my particular favourites. Jacques Louis David's painting of the death of Marat was central to my MA studies in art history and I even made my sister drive me all the way to Brussels just to go and see this. David was a master of detail and this clip shows every inch of the painting in such clarity, it feels as if I am standing right in front of it.

 

 

6. The 1920s

The 1920s hold a peculiar fascination for me - I know it wasn't a golden age but it certainly was a golden age for Hollywood. The biggest stars of the silver screen were bigger and more well-known than any star is today and this clip includes some of my favourites of the silent era. I probably would have been one of the weeping women at Rudolph Valentino's funeral if I had been alive then.

 

Stars of stage and screen, 1920s - Josephine Baker, Harold Lloyd, Fatty Arbuckle, Jackie Coogan, Rudolph Valentino and his funeral in 1926 / Bridgeman Images
Stars of stage and screen, 1920s - Josephine Baker, Harold Lloyd, Fatty Arbuckle, Jackie Coogan, Rudolph Valentino and his funeral in 1926 / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Find out more

Ute Krebs and the Bridgeman Berlin team will be attending Frankfurt Book Fair between 14-18 October 2015.

Meet us at Stand A7, Hall 3.1


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