Nancy's Pics

From bored bulldogs to capitalist "fat cats", here are our Senior Account Manager's favorites from the archive​​​

 

 

What is your role at Bridgeman?

I am a Senior Account Manager at Bridgeman's New York office specializing in our Museums, Galleries, & Auction Houses, Textbook Publishers, and Magazine & Newspaper sectors.

 

What do you love most about the job?

Seeing fine art imagery is a welcome rediscovery as I was a painting major long before working with news photography. I missed looking at not only old masters but also contemporary work and thinking about the craft as well as the creative process. There is also the treasure hunt aspect of finding incredible and often unexpected images in the archive - including some terrific photography and footage. Kind of like finding something amazing in an old attic and wanting to show everyone.

 
What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?

They may not realize the depth of what's in there. Or how relevant and unique of a resource this can be for storytelling today - that what was created hundreds of years ago can have a profound visual impact.

 

Nancy Glowinski, Senior Account Manager

 

 
The Last Judgement, detail of Satan devouring the damned in hell, c.1431 (oil on panel), Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro) (c.1387-1455) / Museo di San Marco dell'Angelico, Florence, Italy

 

 

 

The Last Judgement, detail of Satan devouring the damned in hell, c.1431 (oil on panel), Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro)

For such a horrific scene look how goofy the characters are. And this was created in 1431!

 

 

 

Bulldog, 1927 (w/c on paper), Cecil Charles Windsor Aldin

We've probably all felt like this dog at some point. I don't even know how to identify this expression - ennui? Mild annoyance?

Bulldog, 1927 (w/c on paper), Cecil Charles Windsor Aldin (1870-1935) / Private Collection / The Stapleton Collection

 

 
The Death of Charles Infroit (1874-1920) from 'Le Petit Journal', December 12th, 1920 (colored engraving), French School, (20th century) / Private Collection / Archives Charmet

 

 

The Death of Charles Infroit (1874-1920) from 'Le Petit Journal', December 12th, 1920 (colored engraving)

The grotesque - especially old medical illustrations - have always fascinated me and this one is pretty extreme and makes one grateful that medicine has come a long way since 1856.

 

 

 

Cartoon depicting William Henry Vanderbilt, Jay Gould and Cyrus Field growing fat on the backs of underpaid workers they control, 1880 (color litho)

Although this cartoon depicting an economic climate from 1908 one could draw similar correlations today.

Cartoon depicting William Henry Vanderbilt, Jay Gould and Cyrus Field growing fat on the backs of underpaid workers they control, 1880 (color litho), American School, (19th century) / Private Collection / Peter Newark American Pictures

 


 

Eskimo, 1933, Rockwell Kent  (1882-1971) / Pushkin Museum, Moscow, Russia

 

 

 

Eskimo, 1933, Rockwell Kent

Sure the title of this painting may be politically incorrect today but just look at the beauty of the landscape and composition showing the person as small in the scheme of nature.

Picasso displays and decorates his ceramics in his studio in Vallauris c.1952

It's always fun to see archive footage of an artist making the work.

Picasso displays and decorates his ceramics in his studio in Vallauris c.1952 / Film Images /
 

 

 

 


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