Announcing the Bridgeman Folio

Bridgeman Images is pleased to announce the launch of the Bridgeman Folio. This limited edition Folio features specially commissioned lithographs by 6 Royal Academicians, and has been made in conjunction with the acclaimed Paupers Press.

The lithographs are in an edition of 50, signed and numbered, and are presented in an archival folio box. They have been printed by the acclaimed Paupers Press.

The Bridgeman Folio will be launched on Tuesday the 28th November at the Royal Academy with a champagne reception in the Sir Hugh Casson Room. The artists will be there to discuss the works and Bridgeman Images will be donating 10% of profits to the RA Schools. The Folio is available to buy on CultureLabel.com and Bridgeman Gallery.

 

 

About Paupers Press

Paupers Press is a fine art print and publishing studio that works with both emerging and leading contemporary artists. The studio, based in Hoxton, London, was opened in 1986 and takes commission directly from artists and galleries, as well as publishing under their own name.

Their notable artists include Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Paula Rego, Grayson Perry, Chris Ofili, Eileen Cooper and Craigie Aitchinson, to name but a few.

 

Eileen Cooper
Paul Huxley
Cathie Pilkington

 

Artist Biographies:

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Bill Jacklin

Bill Jacklin (b. 1943) lives and works in New York and was elected a Royal Academician in 1991. Having worked initially as a graphic designer he went on to the Royal College of Art from 1964 to 1967. Jacklin has taught at Chelsea School of Art, Hornsey and the Royal College of Art. His early work was preoccupied with abstraction and he moved towards figuration in the mid 70s before becoming more concerned with movement and light. By 1985 Jacklin started to focus his painting on ‘Urban Portraits of the city in its various guises.

Jacklin has had solo shows in London’s Marlborough Fine Art and New York’s Marlborough Gallery. Jacklin’s commissions have included the Bank of England, the Ivy Restaurant and De Beers and he has been the Official Artist-in-Residence for the British Council in Hong Kong.

 

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Stephen Farthing

Stephen Farthing (b. 1950.) currently lives and works between Mexico City and London. He studied at St Martin’s School of Art and the Royal College of Art, London.  Here he was awarded an Abbey Major Scholarship, which took him to The British School at Rome in 1976. In 1990 he became the Ruskin Master at the Ruskin School of Art and Professional Fellow of St Edmund Hall, Oxford until 2000. Farthing has exhibited extensively in solo shows around the world. He has represented Britain at the Sao Paulo Biennale in 1989, throughout South America and Japan.  He has also participated in many group exhibitions since 1975, including the John Moores Liverpool Exhibitions, in which he was a Prize Winner for eight years. In 1989 Farthing was Artist in Residence at the Hayward Gallery.  He was elected Royal Academician in 1998 and in 2000 was made an Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall, Oxford.

His first book The Intelligent Person's Guide to Modern Art, was published by Duckworth in 2000 and he has subsequently gone on to edit many art historical texts. He was Executive Director of the New York Academy of Art from 2000 until 2004, when he was appointed Rootstein Hopkins Research Chair of Drawing at the University of Arts London.


 

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Cathie Pilkington

Cathie Pilkington (b. 1968) is a sculptor and figurative artist renowned for crafting increasingly ambivalent forms. Her sculptural practice combines the interrelated and antagonistic worlds of fine art and craft. She studied BA Silversmithing at Edinburgh College of Art (1985–91) and was awarded the first John Watson Prize for Art upon graduating in 1991, with a show at the Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She went on to study Sculpture at the Royal College of Art (1995–97). She is currently represented by Marlborough Fine Art, where she had solo shows in 2007, 2010 and 2014. She also recently had an exhibition The Value of the Paw at the V&A Museum of Childhood in 2012. Her work is held in the collections of the Deste Foundation, Athens, Manchester City Art Gallery and the David Roberts Collection.


 

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Paul Huxley

Paul Huxley (born 1938.)  studied at Harrow School of Art from 1951 until 1956 when, at the age of seventeen, he was admitted to the Royal Academy Schools from which he graduated in 1960.  In 1964 Bryan Robertson selected him for ‘The New Generation’ at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, the exhibition which first introduced emerging artists of the sixties to a wider public.  Works in this show from Huxley’s ‘fluid series’ of paintings became highly influential within the genre of new abstract painting at the time and won him first prize in the Stuyvesant Travel Awards.  The award took him to the USA where he met many of the leading American artists of the period such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns, often visiting their studios and in some cases forming lasting friendships.

Over the last four decades Huxley's work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions both in Britain and internationally. Huxley has also taught in art schools throughout his career and has contributed to policy in the academic and curatorial fields. He was a member of the advisory panels for the Arts Council of Great Britain and the Serpentine Gallery, a Trustee of the Tate Gallery, acting for a period as chairman of its Exhibitions Committee, and chairman of the Art & Design Research Exercise for the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

He was Professor of Painting at the Royal College of Art from 1986 until 1998, when he was elected Honorary Fellow and Professor Emeritus. His students have included Dinos Chapman, Nigel Cook, Dexter Dalwood, Andrew Grassie, Tracey Emin, Chantal Joffe and Chris Ofili.

 

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Vanessa Jackson

Vanessa Jackson (b. 1953) lives and works in London. She is a painter and installation wall painter, whose use of geometry and its three dimensional function deny the supposed flatness of modernist space. Her work explores the contradiction of a fully realised space at once pertaining to logic and completeness and uncertainty and unease.

Jackson studied at St Martins School of Art from 1971 until 1975, followed by the Royal College of Art. She was President of the New Contemporaries in 1975. Throughout her career she has exhibited in many solo and group shows including London, Bristol and New York. In the RA’s Summer Exhibition 2015 she won The Sunny Dupree Family Award for a Woman Artist . Her prolific teaching career has seen her serve as Head of Painting at Winchester School of Art for nine years, as MA and Research Tutor at the Royal College of Art for fourteen years and as a Senior Tutor at the RA Schools for fifteen years until 2013. She is presently on the Edwin Austin Abbey Council and the British School at Rome Fine Art Faculty, for which she was previously awarded the Abbey Fellowship in 1995. She is included in Painting: Documents of Contemporary Art, published by the Whitechapel and MIT.

 

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Eileen Cooper

Sometimes described as a magic realist, Eileen Cooper (b. 1953) brings an unapologetically female perspective to her subject-matter, which encompasses sexuality, motherhood, life and death.  She studied at Goldsmiths College from 1971-1974. Senior members of staff at that time included Bert Irvin RA, Basil Beattie RA and Michael Craig Martin RA. She went on to study Painting at the Royal College of Art under Peter de Francia, graduating in 1977 and soon began to exhibit her work.

During the 1980s she became a major figure, well known and regarded for her strong and passionate figuration. Cooper has always taught part time in numerous institutions including St Martins, Royal College of Art and the Royal Academy Schools. She became a Royal Academician in 2000 and from 2010-2017 served as Keeper of the Royal Academy, the first woman to be elected to this role since the Academy began in 1768.

 

 


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